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For Craigkelly we recommend the DM log for strong signal areas, the Log36 for medium signal areas, and the Yagi18K or XB10K for poor signal areas, the latter aerial being particularly well suited to loft mounting. The XB16K is for those with the most marginal signals. The dimensions and test performance of the aerials can be found on the relevant tables.

Craigkelly TV transmitter from the Royal Yacht Britannia.  (Picture Mike Smith)

Craigkelly television transmitter (Pre DSO).   (Pictures MB21)

The close up on the right shows (from the top) the digital transmitting arrays for CH39 and CH42 MUXES, the analogue transmitting arrays and the other digital MUXES (under the glass fibre shroud), the FM radio transmitting arrays (note the mixed polarity) and at the bottom, well to be honest I`m not sure what they were !

Craigkelly transmitter at night, picture taken from the southern shore of the Firth of Forth.                (Picture Bill Wright)

Craigkelly transmitter`s channel guide.

Also check Craigkelly`s nine small repeater transmitters, and Black Hill`s fifty five.


The frequencies given are for (most) digital MUXES, for analogue channels deduct 3MHz.

Craigkelly transmitter`s channels in relation to the UHF TV band and the gain curves of the aerials we recommend for it.   DM Log    Log36    Yagi18K     XB10K   XB16K

If you really need a “high gain” aerial for Craigkelly you should try and use a K group. Note how MUX 6 may be receivable on some A group aerials. Fortunately the 3 main PSB MUXES will be still receivable on an original A group antenna.


Also see other relevant K group curves.

Because of wideband antennas poor response at the bottom of the band, anyone who really requires a “high gain” aerial on a K group transmitter, e.g. Craigkelly, should actually fit a K group !  See Craigkelly`s Graph

(Not that many people actually need a high gain aerial anyway........)

For Craigkelly`s frequencies see its channel allocation guide. This table also includes the same information for some of the other transmitters receivable in the area, namely Angus, Black Hill, Darvel, Penicuik, Selkirk and Chatton. This data can be of great use in determining possible causes of co-channel interference and / or alternative transmitters to try if Craigkelly fails to give an adequate signal, see the importance of “Line Of Sight”. Note how the transmissions “dovetail” together in an attempt to minimise co-channel interference.  The Channel Allocation Guides can also be very useful in the diagnosis of co-channel interference problems and can also be invaluable if you are trying to find a spare channel for a modulated output (e.g. for a Sky box or CCTV system) to be added to your TV setup/distribution system without suffering from co-channel.


There is one interleaved spectrum channel allocated to Craigkelly, CH52, which may be used for a local Edinburgh TV station. In addition, two low power HD MUXES (in the CH 31 to 37 gap) are planned for CH33 (at 11kW) and CH34. All of these possible extra channels can be picked up by decent K group aerials (or widebands).


The transmitter over looks the town of Burntisland which has rather an interesting history form the railways point of view. From 1847/1848 the town was the Southern terminus of the Edinburgh & Northern Railway which extended up to Perth and Tay Port. But this was despite being separated from its namesake by 6 miles of water in the shape of the Firth of Forth !  The trains could travel straight onto the pier for transhipment onto ferries to complete the journey to the Scottish Capital. This anomaly came to an end with the opening of the fabulous Forth bridge in 1890, although by then the Edinburgh & Northern had been absorbed by the North British Railway. Incidentally the aforementioned Forth Bridge was jointly owned by no fewer than four railway companies, namely the North British, the North Eastern, the Great Northern and the Midland !


External links


Craigkelly transmitter page on MB21

Craigkelly transmitter page on Wikipedia

Craigkelly at MDS975


Digital UK details of Central Scotland transmitters

Ofcom details of Central Scotland transmitters

Craigkelly transmitter was built in 1971, or rather more accurately it was rebuilt on its present site. The tower was originally in use at Emley Moor in 1956 by the IBA, as the first of the three transmitters to have been in existence there.  The tower is situated about 8 miles North of Edinburgh, overlooking the Firth of Forth and the most famous bridge in the world. Its population coverage is about 1 million and it uses nine small repeater transmitters to improve its coverage in fringe areas.

The site altitude is 182m and the structure height is 125m with the transmitting arrays possibly another 10m or so above that, see How High Is High ?

Being a "main transmitter" it is horizontally polarised.  Craigkelly was originally an A group but the advent of digital means it`s now a K group (or wideband) because MUXES 4 to 6 are now out of group. That said, if you live in a strong signal area you may well pick them up OK (especially MUX 6).

The original A group only went up to CH 35 but was modified in the mid 90s.  However, the 3 main PSB MUXES should still be receivable on an original A group aerial.

The transmission power for MUXES 1 to 3 is 20kW, and for MUXES 4 to 6 it`s 10kW (before the June 2011 switchover it was only 4kW and 2kW respectively).

Craigkelly Transmitter           OS Grid Ref  NT 233 872


Note, due to the new phenomenon of MUXICAL chairs you may experience problems with certain MUXES disappearing. First try rescanning your TV / set top box, do it manually if possible.

If this fails to sort it check on transmitter work or call the reception advice phone numbers.


Also see basic digital fault finding.


Switchover occurred at Craigkelly in June 2011.

We are more than willing to give advice to those actually purchasing from us. Could those only seeking information please just find the answer somewhere on this site, or ring an aerial installer local to them, or call the reception advice phone numbers.

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The dotted lines are the 2 planned lower power HD MUXES