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Interpreting The Results


I thought long and hard about how to make the test results relevant and comparable with each other, and have decided to show all readings (in dBμV ) relative to a DM Log Periodic aerial. The latter has a pretty flat gain curve and thus is an ideal control aerial. Quite apart from anything else, wherever possible (i.e. in reasonable signal areas), Logs should be used as a matter of course, so the table(s) will show how much gain you have to make your decision on antenna choice. Note how the Log performs pretty well (in terms of gain) against small/medium wideband Yagis at the bottom of the band(s) but falls behind as the frequency rises. For those who are interested I reckon that the gain of a DM log would be about 6 dB at the bottom of the band, then rising by about one dB in the middle, before dropping again at the top end. These are the figures I used when calculating the absolute gain for the graphs.

The absolute gain figures are conservative estimates, though they are accurate relative to each other. Remember that all aerial test readings are approximate anyway, as far as I`m aware no lab will even guarantee accuracy better than +/- 0.5dB, and relative to each other these test results aren`t going to be much behind that.

Note this is dBd, gain compared to a half wave dipole, NOT the (dishonest ? ) dBi....

Differences in the test results of one dBμV on any individual frequency should be disregarded, manufacturing tolerances or a truck going over a hill somewhere between the test site and the TX could easily account for those ! Furthermore the response of any aerial is not linear, its gain curve will have bumps and dips in it. That said, a 1dB difference across the whole band is significant, and an increase (or decrease) of two or three dB is very significant. It should be remembered that 3 dB is a 40% higher signal level and such an increase at the aerial (as opposed to through an amplifier) is very difficult to achieve.

Obviously if you live in a decent reception area these amounts of signal variation are not important, but if that`s the case, you should just use a Log Periodic anyway !


Always remember, when it comes to aerial gain,

things aren`t always what they seem.


It should be borne in mind that gain is not everything, which is why Logs are still one of the best aerials despite being having relatively low gain figures. Impulse noise rejection, directivity, out of band rejection, cross polar rejection and front to back ratio and can all have significant effects on the quality of the received signal. Having said that, gain is a function of the others (apart from impulse noise rejection) as it demonstrates that the antenna is performing efficiently. Indeed gain must be a function of the others. Why must ? Well an aerial is a passive device, the only way it can increase its gain (in a particular direction) is at the "expense" of gain in the other directions. As an aerial`s gain increases, its acceptance angle (and its Cross Polar Rejection come to that) decrease. They must do, there is no other way for the aerial to increase its gain.

All of the above is before you even start talking about wind loading considerations and/or build quality. Fortunately, we know what we`re talking about when it comes to the latter.      

There are no “Bacofoil aerials” here.....  

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The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.

As expected the A group aerials display the biggest superiority in gain over widebands. In fact such is the widebands inferiority that there is no such thing as a “High Gain” wideband aerial for the A group frequencies.


We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas, the Log 36 for medium signal areas. For poor signal areas we advise the Yagi 18A  (particularly for outdoor installs) or the XB10A [particularly for loft installs].  The XB16A is for those with the most marginal signals for outdoor installs, unless you`ve got a massive loft !


The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.


The prices of the aerials are on the Aerials Shop page.


For the curves of other relevant aerials click here.

The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.

 

We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas areas,the Log 36 for medium signal areas. For poor signal areas we advise the Yagi 18B (particularly for outdoor installs) or the XB10B [particularly for loft installs]. The XB16B is for those with the most marginal signals for outdoor installs, unless you`ve got a massive loft !


The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.


The prices of the antennas are on the Aerials Shop page.


For the curves of other relevant aerials including a Contract 10B and a Tri Boom 75 click here.

The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.  


We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas,the Log 36 for medium signal areas, the Yagi 18CD or the DY14WB for poor signal areas. The XB16E is forthose with the most marginal signals and outdoor installs, unless you`ve got a huge loft !


The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.  


The prices of the antennas are on the Aerials Shop page.


For the curves of other relevant aerials including a Contract 10CD and a Tri Boom 75 click here.


Also see "covering all eventualities".

The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.

 

We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas, the Log 36 for medium signal areas, the Yagi 18K or XB10K for poor signal areas. The XB10 is particularly suitable for loft installs due to its relatively small size for its gain. The XB16K is for those with the most marginal signals, and outdoor installs, unless you`ve got a massive loft !


The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.


The prices of the antennas are on the Aerials Shop page


Notice the significant superiority of the K group aerials over the wideband. In fact such is the wideband inferiority that there is no such thing as a “High Gain” wideband aerial for the K group frequencies.


For the curves of other relevant aerials including a Tri Boom 75 click here.

The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.


An E group aerial is a “semi wideband” whose response is optimised for the middle/top of the band, at a cost of some gain down at the bottom,see Group Gain Curves.


We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas,the Log 36 for medium signal areas, the Yagi 18E or the DY14WB for poor signal areas and the XB16E is for those with the most marginal signals and outdoor installs, unless you`ve got a huge loft !


The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.


The prices of the antennas are on the Aerial Shop page


For the curves of other relevant aerials including a Tri Boom 75 click here.

The test methodology and points to bear in mind when interpreting the results are explained above.


We recommend the DM log for strong signal areas, the Log 36 for medium signal areas, the DY14WB for poor signal areas.


For use on boats and caravans we always recommend the DM Log.


I`m not really a fan of wideband Yagis, but as one can see from the graph the DY14WB has exceptional performance. Bearing in mind the fact the DY14 is only 5ft long its gain figures are remarkable and this makes it reasonably suitable for loft installs



The dimensions of the aerials can be found on the relevant table.


The prices of the antennas are on the Aerials Shop page


For the curves of other relevant aerials including a Contract 10WB and a Tri Boom 75 click here.

Notes.

There is no wideband aerial which will give “high gain” at the bottom of the band. If you must have a wideband, and you`re sure you require more gain at the bottom end, you`re best option is to diplex an A group with an E group, or even an A group with another (high gain) wideband if you already have one of those. Remember that most people don`t need a “high gain” aerial though !


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The above table is a summary of the A group results, see full results.


In our tests other models of 18 element A group gave around 2.5dB (average) over the A group (relative to the DM log).

B Group Aerials

The above table is a summary of the B group results, full results.

In our tests other models of 18 element B group Yagis gave between 4.2dB and 4.6dB (average) over the B group, relative to a DM Log.

C/D Group Aerials

The above table is a summary of the C/D group results, full results.

In our tests other models of 18 element C/D group gave between 4.0dB and 4.7dB (average) over the C/D group, relative to a DM Log.

K Group Aerials

E Group Aerials

The adjoining table is a summary of the E group results,

for full results click here

The above table is a summary of the wideband group results, full results

Typical models of Yagi 10 element wideband average between 1.0 and 1.3dB *.

Typical models of XB5 wideband average between 1.2 and 1.9dB.

Typical models of Yagi 18 element wideband average between 1.7 and 2.8dB.

Typical models of XB10 wideband average between 2.5 and 4.0dB.


 * All figures are average over the whole band relative to a DM Log.

A Group Aerials

ATV Stock Aerial Tests      


This page contains the test results for all the aerials we recommend/stock for the different groups. The results are arranged in tables as follows :


The A group aerials we stock

The B group aerials we stock

The C/D group aerials we stock

The K group aerials we stock

The E group aerials we stock

The Wideband aerials we stock


Also see ATV`s tests of FM / DAB antennas


Note that TV frequency band after switchover now only goes up to CH60, so the Yagi18K and the XB16K are effectively post DSO widebands because their gain curves go past CH60 !

The adjoining table is a summary of the K group results,

for full results click here.

We are more than willing to give advice to those actually purchasing from us. Could those only seeking information please just find the answer somewhere on this site, or ring an aerial installer local to them, or call the reception advice phone numbers.

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If you`ve found this site informative and, hopefully, interesting as well,

please help us increase the number of people reading it.


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Gain graph of ATV stock A group aerials ATV stock A group aerial gain figures ATV stock B group aerial gain figures ATV stock C/D group aerial gain figures ATV stock K group aerial gain figures ATV stock E group aerial gain figures ATV stock T group & wideband aerial gain figures Gain graph of ATV stock B group aerials Gain graph of ATV stock C/D group aerials Gain graph of ATV stock K group aerials Gain graph of ATV stock E group aerials Gain graph of ATV stock T group & wideband aerials